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How Will Blockchain Revolutionize IT Infrastructure?

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Blockchain & IT Infrastructure

Advancements in blockchain technology have certainly had a major impact on the cryptocurrency market. As new tokens present alternatives to old financial systems, many people are perhaps overlooking the power of blockchain technology behind the projects themselves. Let’s take a look at some of the biggest blockchain projects on the market today and how they can potentially influence the future of IT infrastructure.

File Storage

When most people think of file storage from a traditional standpoint, it seems like a binary system. Either you have enough storage or you don’t. Just a few decades ago, people had to rely upon CDs and floppy disks, which were slow and added very minimal amounts of memory. Of course, external hard drives improved this. Finally, today there are cloud storage solutions like Dropbox, OneDrive, iCloud, and others that offer some degree of improvement. While these solutions are better, they are still far from optimal.

Blockchain projects like Filecoin (FIL) and Storj (STORJ) could be the solutions that change the future of file storage. First of all, these solutions are considered to be much better than today’s most popular cloud storage products because they promise to have higher bandwidth and fewer unexpected outages. In addition, decentralized file storage applications also address the issue of privacy. Because traditional cloud storage products hold data in centralized databases, every user’s files are at risk of being hacked. In fact, this happened to Dropbox back in 2012 when 68 million users were hacked. The most alarming thing is that the company didn’t even report this issue until 2016. With decentralized file storage solutions, hacks are extremely more difficult to execute, and any data breach wouldn’t affect nearly as many users.

Another vital component driving the adoption of decentralized file storage is the fact that prices will be much lower than current solutions. That’s because files will be stored across a P2P network instead of via expensive database centers. This will likely be done by using cryptocurrency payments as incentives for individual users to join the network.

Check out our complete guide to decentralized file storage solutions.

Mesh Networks

Mesh networking has grown from a commercially-used technology to a consumer-level technology in just a few short years. Today’s products like Eero, Luma, and Google Wi-Fi all help to decrease wireless internet connection dead spots and boost connectivity levels for devices. Mesh networks work by adding nodes to Wi-FI network so that devices have multiple possible connection points, not just the single connection point offered by traditional routers and existing IT infrastructure.

Projects like Althea and SmartMesh (SMT) can be

applied to solve internet connectivity problems in previously unconnected, remote places as well as those with high network congestion (i.e. sport stadiums and concert venues). Because data with SmartMesh, for example, doesn’t have to go through centralized networks and can instead remain within the mesh network, connection speeds are faster and electricity consumption is lower. Althea goes beyond just offering wireless internet to coffee shops and airports. It offers the ability for communities to create their own decentralized ISPs, which also make browsing private and neutral by default. Decentralized mesh network projects won’t just make the internet itself faster and more widely available but will also advance the capabilities of newer technologies like IoT and IoE.

Computation

While the computing power of regular computers is increasing every year, the capabilities of one machine are still no match for that of a supercomputer. That’s why projects like Golem (GNT) and iExec RLC (RLC) have become popular.

Allowing people to buy and sell computing power necessary to complete more complex tasks essentially allows anyone to create a supercomputer from using the power of multiple computers across the network. For now, Golem is focusing on a single use case: CGI rendering. However, as the projects like these continue to develop their technologies, it’s easy to see how this concept could also be applied to solve current computation limitations. For example, scientific modeling, data science, machine learning, and many more potential applications could all benefit from decentralized computation.

Decentralized computation will allow businesses to scale their IT infrastructure by giving them more computing power at lower costs. Instead of having to buy a supercomputer which could run in the millions or even billions of dollars, businesses could one day have access to a similar level of computing power at a fraction of the cost. The best part about this model is the flexibility it can offer for those needing extra computing power. Instead of having to buy a large amount of dedicated equipment, users would simply pay the network only when extra amounts of computation are required.

Conclusion

File storage, mesh networks, and computation will all see the benefits of advancements in blockchain technology. Even though the above-mentioned projects have already produced some promising results, there could very well be even more projects that will change these and other important sectors of IT. In the coming years for IT infrastructure, we will likely see increased security and privacy as well as decreasing costs.

Blockchain

This Virginia Lawmaker Argues Blockchain Can Boost Local Elections, Economy

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A Virginia lawmaker is pushing her commonwealth’s government to study how blockchain could shape the future of local elections and commerce. 

On Jan. 8, Delegate Hala Ayala (D-51) offered two bills to the House of Delegates: the first calling for Virginia’s Department of Elections to investigate blockchain as a means to secure elections, and the second requesting the Virginia Economic Development Partnership (VEDP) research blockchain’s current and coming role in the Old Dominion’s economy. 

Together, they comprise Ayala’s political drive to embrace – or at least consider – integrating distributed ledger technology in Virginia life. 

They’re also a product of Ayala’s subject matter expertise. She was an information security specialist with the U.S. Coast Guard for nearly 20 years before transitioning to a cybersecurity role at the Transportation Security Administration in 2017, where she continues to work.

“Right now blockchain is a thriving technology,” said Ayala, who was appointed chair of the newly formed Technology and Innovation Subcommittee last week.

The bills outline Ayala’s proposed roadmap to studying blockchain technologies. This is most clear in her election bill. It’s a response to the ongoing threat of election interference by “bad actors,” she said.

But it’s also a detailed prescription to get ahead of future attacks. With text imploring the Virginia Department of Elections to study current blockchain voting mechanisms, perform a

cost-benefit analysis and then determine “whether and how to implement blockchain” in elections, the bill offers a path to possible implementation. 

“We have to take blockchain very seriously and understand it has the mechanics and mechanisms that could potentially provide us with more secure election protection,” Ayala said.

The economy bill, too, would nudge blockchain toward more widespread implementation in Virginia, with two years of mandated studies on the tech’s prevalence and role in intrastate commerce. 

If passed, VEDP would produce multiple reports outlining what the government should do to foster sector growth. Ayala said it would also tamp down on corporate overreach, keeping companies honest.  

While Ayala hopes the reports will shed light on how the commonwealth can take advantage of this relatively new technology, she has not yet committed to implementing blockchain tools.

“We need to do our homework first to see how we can apply these technologies to their businesses as well as our elections,” she said.

Ultimately, her economics bill seeks to create “a statewide, comprehensive, and coordinated strategy relating to blockchain technology,” the text reads. 

“Technology is always ever evolving, and we want to make sure that we are on the forefront and leading the way here in the commonwealth,” Ayala said.

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This Startup Thinks Blockchain Is The Only Thing That Can Save Social Media

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For any business on the Internet, using Amazon, Microsoft or another cloud computing giant is a fact of life. DFINITY founder Dominic Williams wants to change that. His blockchain nonprofit created an internet protocol called “The Internet Computer” that aims to decentralize the internet by putting cloud services (and all of their data) on independent systems.

Now, DFINITY is showing off its new blockchain technology at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland with a demonstration of an “open” social network called LinkedUp, a decentralized alternative to LinkedIn, that is not owned or operated by a corporate entity. 

LinkedUp was built only as a demonstration for now, but the code is open source, meaning that any third-party developer that wishes can begin tinkering with the code and ultimately bring the idea to market if they so choose. Because the software is built on DFINITY’s Internet Computer platform, a public record of any changes will be available for anyone to review.

“We have no idea how Facebook creates its News Feed, and we have no idea how Facebook processes our data, and we have no way of knowing if it ships that data to Cambridge Analytica, and that is one key difference with an open Internet,” Williams said in a phone interview. “[On LinkedUp] you can see the updates to the software going through the governance system, so you know exactly what changes have been made and how the system works.”

In essence, social networks would no longer be a black box. All users would have a much deeper understanding of how the proprietary algorithms work and why they see certain pieces of content. They would have direct access to the code that governs these networks. And thus, Williams argues, people would be more empowered to fight against monopolistic trends in the existing internet infrastructure.

Investors are paying close attention to William’s idea. The Zug, Switzerland-based firm has raised $190 million from Andreessen Horowitz and crypto investors Polychain Capital and Multicoin Capital.

Williams hopes that his LinkedUp application will inspire others to create open versions of other popular software like WhatsApp, Facebook, eBay, and more. He wants to challenge the largest tech companies that control software, and thus the fate of any companies that choose to build on top of their platforms.

DFINITY released a software development kit two months ago to enable developers to build new web applications on its platform. The company plans to launch the Internet Computer later this year.

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Roger Ver, Da Hongfei, Alex Mashinsky to speak at Istanbul Blockchain Week

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Istanbul Blockchain Week has just announced the speaker line up for its Istanblock 2020 event. The conference, which will take place in April, will feature several prominent figures in the crypto industry, including Roger Ver, Da Hongfei, and Alex Mashinsky.

Turkey’s premier blockchain event announces high-profile speaker line up

While few would put Turkey on the list of places with a burgeoning blockchain scene, the country has been ramping up its efforts to get recognized as a leader in the new technology.

The country’s premier blockchain event, Istanbul Blockchain Week, will be taking place from 6-10 April and will see dozens of events taking place across Turkey’s largest city. One of the most highly-anticipated events will be the Istanblock 2020.

The organizers of the event have now announced the speaker lineup for the crypto-focused event, saying attendees can look forward to some big hitters from the world of blockchain and crypto taking to the stage.

Roger Ver, a Bitcoin Cash evangelist and executive chairman of Bitcoin.com will be spearheading the event, the organizers said, adding that he will be joined by other “thought leaders and luminaries” from the industry.

Da Hongfei, the founder

of blockchain project NEO, will be one of the speakers, as will Alex Mashinsky, the founder of the Celsius Network.

Raising awareness of Turkish blockchain projects

Cryptocurrency exchanges will also be one of the topics discussed at the event, as Ben Zhou, the CEO and founder of Bybit has been announced as one of the speakers.

However, the event will also feature some big names that don’t come from crypto. According to the announcement, DP Suresh, the vice president of engineering at Yahoo, will be among the event’s speakers.

Erhan Korhaliller, Founder and CEO of crypto PR agency EAK Digital which organized the event, said that the goal of Istanbul Blockchain Week was to promote Turkish blockchain projects globally. He said in the announcement:

“Already, so many people in Turkey are familiar with crypto. What this event will do is catapult that enthusiasm and energy onto the world stage. It’s going to be exciting.”

The Istanbul Blockchain Week will take place from April 6-10, while its crowning event, Istanblock 2020, will be held on April 9-10.

You can buy tickets on the event’s official website and follow the event on Twitter for more updates.

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