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Exchange Makes It Easier to Purchase Crypto Using Fiat for First Time

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A crypto exchange says it is providing a much-needed bridge between fiat and digital currencies — offering an easy, accessible, intuitive platform to consumers, especially when purchasing crypto for the very first time.

BitMart says too many exchanges rely on crypto-to-crypto transactions or depend on stablecoin trading pairs. Although this may be perfectly practical for enthusiasts who already own coins and tokens, the company says this can alienate large swaths of the public — many of whom have been taking a wait-and-see approach to cryptocurrencies, including Bitcoin (BTC).

The exchange, which has offices around the world — including in New York, Seoul, Hong Kong and Nigeria — has the ambition of becoming the go-to channel for those who are looking for a way into the crypto world. To this end, the likes of Bitcoin and Ether (ETH) can be acquired through more than 300 payment methods.

BitMart has launched its fiat channel through a partnership with Evolve Bank & Trust. It supports same-day electronic payments via bank transfers, debit cards and credit cards with more than 2,500 banking institutions across the United States. The exchange currently offers zero fees for deposits and withdrawals, and once a fast verification process is completed, transactions can be initiated within a single click, enabling buying and selling to be done within seconds.

Customers get their own beneficiary accounts with the Evolve Bank and Trust for their assets, and transactional activities are only implemented with their express instructions. Email notifications and identity verification tools are also used to guarantee high levels of security.

A partnership with Simplex, an European Union-authorized financial institution, has enabled BitMart to accept fiat deposits via MasterCard and Visa cards. Meanwhile, a collaboration with Paxful enables crypto to be purchased using gift cards and PayPal. BitMart says it has chosen its third-party partners carefully to ensure that the process of purchasing crypto is easy, convenient and trustworthy — thereby removing barriers to entry.

Streamlined and reliable

Coins can be deposited directly into a user’s BitMart account, cutting down on the number of steps they need to take in order to keep their assets safe. From here, the consumer’s crypto options widen substantially, as they can trade their BTC or ETH for more than 110 cryptocurrencies offered through in excess of 235 trading pairs.

The company has the goal of being a “world-class digital asset trading platform.” To this end, a multi-layer and multi-cluster trading architecture is used to achieve stability and scalability, and eight major languages — English, simplified Chinese, traditional Chinese, Japanese, Vietnamese, Korean, Russian and Turkish — are supported. BitMart plans to offer additional languages in the not-too-distant future as it continues its quest to appeal to an international audience.

The exchange claims that it has amassed more than 850,000 registered users, with a daily trading volume of $768 million, since its launch back in March 2018.

Features in the pipeline

Along with making it easier for everyday consumers to purchase cryptocurrency with various payment methods, BitMart says it has been seeking to bridge the gap between traditional finance and cryptocurrency world by offering spot trading and over-the-counter trading. Upcoming features include decentralized trading and future contract trading — delivering a greater range of products to its expanding user base.

BitMart is currently available online, through specially created apps for Android and iOS devices, and via the H5 mobile browser. Maker and taker fees are calculated based on each user’s trading volume over the past 30 days, along with the number of BMX — the company’s native token — that they currently hold in their account.

BitMart currently ranks in the top-10 crypto exchanges on CoinMarketCap and has the goal of reaching the top 10,000 of Alexa’s global website ranking, opening USD trading pairs and gaining 1.5 million registered users by the fourth quarter of 2019.

Source:cointelegraph

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Presidential candidate Andrew Yang vows to promote crypto legislation

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“In order to regulate technology effectively, our government needs to understand it. It’s embarrassing to see the ignorance some members of Congress display when talking about technology, and anyone who watched Congress question Mark Zuckerberg is well aware of this”, said the 2020 US Presidential Candidate Andrew Yang.

In his latest blog post titled, ‘Regulating Technology Firms in the 21st Century’, Yang wrote that the government needs to be forward-thinking and informed on the latest technological developments to keep pace with innovation. He added that without a base level of understanding, it’s unreasonable to expect proper regulation of major tech firms or the drafting of legislation that addresses the critical technical issues.

According to the Democratic Candidate, legislators are blind to, or completely unprepared to comprehend technical aspects of the cryptocurrency industry and due to the unregulated nature, the marketplace has seen levels of fraud. He further said,

” Other countries, which are ahead of us on regulation, are leading in this new marketplace and dictating the rules that we’ll need to follow once we catch up… Cryptocurrencies and digital assets have quickly grown to represent a large amount of value and economic activity, outstripping government’s response. A national framework for regulating these assets has failed to emerge, with several federal agencies claiming conflicting jurisdiction.”

Yang also emphasized that the market is being outpaced by innovation. If he wins the 2020 Presidential Election, Yang promised to promote legislation that provides clarity on cryptocurrency and digital asset market space by defining a ‘token’ and distinguishing ‘security’ from it. Yang affirmed that he will define which federal agencies have regulatory power over crypto/digital assets space and provide protection for the consumers. Additionally, tax implications of owning, selling, and trading digital assets will also be clarified.

Source:ambcrypto

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Crypto Derivatives: A Corner of the Market or the Market Itself?

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Emmanuel Goh is co-founder & CEO of skew. – a financial technology startup headquartered in London since 2018. These opinions are his and do not necessarily reflect the view of CoinDesk.

The following article originally appeared in Institutional Crypto by CoinDesk, a weekly newsletter focused on institutional investment in crypto assets. Sign up for free here.


The race is on.

One business day before the much-awaited ICE/Bakkt launch, the CME announced it would be listing bitcoin options in Q1 2020. ICE returned the favor by announcing it would also be launching options contracts but in December this year/

Why are two of the largest exchanges in the world competing so openly for a space that was considered, until recently, as secondary by most industry insiders?

Trending

Almost every week, a new player is announcing its intention to enter the increasingly crowded crypto futures market. Most recently crypto behemoths Binance and Bitfinex launched their own futures products, with varying degrees of success.

This optimism wasn’t always there. The rise of Hong-Kong based BitMEX – home to the most liquid bitcoin contract globally – was for a long time met with skepticism by industry leaders, who dismissed the product as only serving gambling addicts with the use of high leverage.

The crypto futures market really took off in 2018. Volumes increased by a factor of ten compared to 2017 levels – a year widely seen as the peak of the crypto market. Bitcoin futures and other perpetual swap instruments are now trading, on average, 10x more volume than the underlying bitcoin spot market according to data compiled by skew and Bitwise.

(source: skew.com)

In hindsight, it is relatively simple to explain why. As the market entered a prolonged downturn starting in 2018, market participants looked for ways to profit from, or at least hedge against, the falling prices. The growth in futures markets came from that need to short the market.

The market evolved rapidly from very little two years ago. In Q4 2017, the Financial Times published, in a well-researched article, how shorting the stock of chipmaker Nvidia – the products of which were very popular with cryptocurrency miners – could be one of the most convenient ways to get short exposure to cryptocurrencies.

A crypto anomaly? Not really…

Traditional markets also experienced a “derivatives moment” in response to increased volatility in the market. The seventies were a period of incredible financial turbulence as Richard Nixon abolished the Bretton Woods system in 1971, moving to a fiat monetary system, and allowing all currencies to float. The world subsequently went through the first oil shock in October 1973, sending the price of black gold skyrocketing in what was previously a quiet market.

A few months prior, in 1973, in a (not so) curious twist of events, Fischer Black and Myron Scholes found a simple analytical formula to price options, which won the 1997 Nobel Prize two decades later. The conjunction of those two events is widely seen as having started a glory period in derivatives products across all asset classes.

It wasn’t just a fad. The Office of the Comptroller of the Currency in Washington estimates banks currently have exposure to more than $200 trillion notional of derivatives. Derivatives have gradually become the place where the majority of interested parties are coming to trade – across all markets.

“We will tame Bitcoin” – Emeritus CME chairman Leo Melamed

Should we believe the prediction from the legendary futures trader?

There has been a consensus view that bitcoin is too volatile to be a medium of exchange – triggering a wave of “stable coin” projects in 2017 and 2018. The inelastic supply function of bitcoin is, by construction, indifferent to demand or supply shocks – making all the adjustment occurring through price and creating volatility as a result. Good logic, but not necessarily true in practice. For instance, this argument is also valid for gold, which is one of the lowest volatility assets around, with an average daily move of 0.6% in 2019 according to data obtained from the Federal Reserve of Saint Louis.

There are a number of factors that contribute to an asset’s volatility. One of them is its market structure. Academics have extensively researched the impact of developing derivatives markets on the volatility of underlying assets and have overwhelmingly concluded that derivatives help to stabilize prices.

This is particularly true for options, as flows are usually dominated by call overwriting (selling calls to overlay an underlying position) as investors are looking to generate extra yield. The income fund launched by LA-based Wave Financial is a first step in that direction within the crypto markets.

Bitcoin’s volatility will decrease structurally as those markets keep growing.

Natural selection

Derivatives rhyme with leverage, which essentially allows you to do more with less. That’s great, but only to a certain extent. As Warren Buffet famously said, derivatives are financial weapons of mass destruction and require careful risk management.

Regulators have as a result been working on curbing the use of leverage globally. In May 2019, Japan’s FSA asked bitFlyer to reduce leverage for its perpetual swap product. The UK FCA is taking even more drastic action by planning to ban the offering of crypto derivatives to retail investors. The regulator also asks retail brokers to warn their customers of the risks of investing using derivatives products, across all asset classes.

“CFDs are complex instruments and come with a high risk of losing money rapidly due to leverage. 72% of retail investor accounts lose money when trading CFDs with this provider.” – Welcome message on a popular retail brokerage platform

If 72% of investors lose money trading CFDs on low volatility underlyings, what could go wrong trading 100x levered products on the infamously volatile bitcoin?

It is likely that, over time, regulators or simply Darwinism will increasingly put the derivatives market in the hands of professionals.

Not only about volumes

Most participants – including us at skew. – spend probably too much time worrying about volumes. Derivatives volumes are mostly a function of leverage. When Japan’s FSA asked bitFlyer to reduce the maximum available leverage from 15x to 4x on the 28th of May, its volumes declined overnight by at least 50%.

(source: skew.com)

Derivatives are zero sum contracts between two counterparties. Traders and investors have to maintain collateral against those open positions. Leading venue BitMEX asks for a minimum maintenance margin of 0.5% and a minimum initial margin of 1%. The CME on the other hand asks for 37% of initial margin. That means if you would like to open a $1 million long position on BitMEX, you can post as little as $10,000 in collateral versus at least $370,000 at CME.

The total $ amount of bitcoin futures contracts opened – called open interest – at CME currently stands at $150 million contract in comparison with $1.1 billion at BitMEX. Because of margin requirements it is likely there is a similar amount of money “working” to trade Bitcoin derivatives at CME and BitMEX despite the later trading 10x more volumes. The “herd” might be closer than people think.

This is a great setup for the offshore exchanges which are able to make significantly more money from the same amount of capital as they collect their fees from the volumes traded.

An increasingly central question: what is the price of bitcoin?

Victims of their own success, derivatives venues were hit in 2019 with a first-world problem.

As trading occurs on margin, derivatives exchanges have been careful to design a spot price index derived from the price of what were, initially, much larger physical exchanges. The index is used to settle the contracts at expiry, and decide when to initiate margin calls. It was a smart way of preventing manipulation of the then not-so-liquid crypto derivatives contracts.

However, as the derivatives market has grown exponentially, we have now entered a period where the underlying physical exchanges are much smaller than the derivatives exchanges – only 10% of total volumes in aggregate. It has become tempting to try to manipulate the less liquid underlying exchanges to yield some profits trading the derivatives.

This was most visible earlier this year in May when a relatively small-size order on physical exchange Bitstamp triggered a wave of liquidations at BitMEX and took the entire market down.

Exchanges seem to have been increasingly aware of the problem and have been attempting to strengthen their indices – sometimes with unfortunate consequences, as with a recent miscalculation at Deribit costing the exchange $1.3 million.

“There’s a whole ocean of oil under our feet! No one can get at it except for me!” – There Will be Blood’s Daniel Plainview

With the CBOE officially out, expect the competition between CME and ICE to be heating up in 2020 as the two exchanges roll out their options offering.

It would be particularly encouraging to see corporate hedging flows taking off, led by mining companies and supported by physically delivered and options contracts. The Mexican government is said to have spent $1 billion on put options this year to hedge its 2020 oil production. Still some way to go for crypto derivatives.

Source:coindesk

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China Is Poised for Another Crypto Trading Crackdown as Speculative Fever Returns

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Financial regulators in China appear set to crack down on cryptocurrency trading again after President Xi Jinping’s praise for blockchain technology revived speculation in the sector.

Regulators in each district of Shanghai must search and inspect local crypto exchange-related services before Nov. 22 and report to the central bank for further actions, according to an official notice signed by the Shanghai Internet Finance Rectification Agency and the Shanghai Bureau of the People’s Bank of China.

The notice emerged online on Friday. Chinese business publication Caixin confirmed its authenticity in a report published later that evening. The effort is led by the Shanghai government’s finance bureau, Caixin said.

The move underscores China’s complicated relationship with emerging decentralized technologies. In his speech earlier this month, President Xi called on his countrymen to “accelerate the development of blockchain technology,” and China has long been a favored location for bitcoin miners. On the other hand, the government banned crypto-to-fiat trading and initial coin offerings (ICOs) two years ago, near the height of the bubble. Crypto-to-crypto trading remained accessible.

According to the notice, regulators in each district of Shanghai are required to look for any entity that is organizing virtual currency trading activities inside China, or ICOs using a blockchain.

Promotional and brokerage services inside China for ICO projects that are registered outside of the country also fall under the inspection scope of the local financial regulators.

Caixin said speculation on crypto has reemerged in China following President Xi’s speech earlier this month.

Social media ban

Meanwhile, China’s social media platform Weibo has banned users from publishing any posts that contain “blockchain” and “crypto trading” at the same time.

Such content “contains information that violates related laws and regulation or Weibo’s community terms,” according to the message that pops up when a user tries to mention both terms. It is not clear when the restriction was put into place, and as of Friday, it was still possible to publish the phrase “crypto trading” or “blockchain,” just not together.

The Shanghai government’s notice also comes at a time when some exchanges are expanding their local presence to tap into the Chinese market.

Binance, which has a dedicated team in Shanghai, recently rolled out peer-to-peer trading on its platform that enables users to buy or sell cryptocurrencies using Chinese yuan through bank wires, AliPay or WeChat.

On Nov. 14, Binance’s official Weibo account was abruptly suspended by the social media platform for “being complained [about] for violating laws and regulations.”

The exchange said that the suspension was due to a “malicious report” filed by some users to the social media platform and it’s appealing to Weibo to reopen the account. Similarly, the official Weibo account of blockchain project Tron was suspended on Nov. 15.

A few weeks ago, a little-known Beijing-based cryptocurrency exchange called Biss, which claims to offer a channel for Chinese investors to buy U.S. stocks using cryptocurrency, was reportedly under investigation by local police. The exchange said in an announcement on Nov. 4 that some of BISS’ operational staff are “actively assisting the investigation by authorities.”

Source:coindesk

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