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Crypto Scam

SCAM ALERT: DeFi Investors Targeted by Dangerous Malware

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Never a dull day in crypto: Impersonators are sending phishing emails on behalf of credible DeFi and NFT enthusiasts

Numerous investors from the decentralized finances segment shared that they received fraudulent emails with PDF files attached. Unfortunately, some of them opened the attachments.

No, Sisyphus will not send you Parallel DAO SAFT

Yesterday, on Oct. 29, 2021, Twitter user @cryptofan777 unveiled that he/she received an email from an address that impersonates well-known DeFi investor Sisyphus of NFT product Pebble DAO.

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According to the subject of the email, it included a simple agreement for future tokens (SAFT) from the Parallel DAO project. At the same time, the email included no text and was not signed.RelatedBitcoin Scammers Using My Name in Emails Now, Beware: TV Anchor Martin Lewis

The recipient admitted that he/she opened this PDF file and that “seemed to have been the issue.” It appeared to be dangerous malware:

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On call with team right now. Situation is bad, will address soon.

At least three blockchain-focused VC heavyweights were targeted by this attack. The same email—but with Paradigm Capital mentioned—was sent by malefactors to Sino Global Capital, Sneaky Ventures and County Capital.

The “real” Sisyphus immediately stated that it was not him behind these emails:

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If you get an email from [email protected], the chances that it’s actually me are near-zero. Please do not open or click on any links. (…) Should say zero. I have not sent out any emails from that email address in over 24 hours.

Anubis DAO rugged for $60 million

Moreover, Parallel DAO representatives emphasized that their product has no SAFT, so these emails are part of a blatant phishing (“keylogging”) scam:

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The price of ANKH, the main token of the project’s ecosystem, immediately dropped to $0 after the removal of liquidity.

Anubis DAO had no website and promoted itself as a fork of Olympus DAO.

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Scams

5 Tips To Recognize Scam in Altcoins?

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The amount of different altcoins increases daily and there are more and more frauds happening. So how to identify the next 1000x rocket and avoid scams like SquidGame?

1. Amount of holders

Check the holder amount, always! This is something that can be also inflated, but coins with a market cap of millions with only a couple thousand holders are rare and should always raise a red flag! This is easily done by looking into the contract either in EtherScan or BscScan!

2. Look at Liquidity Pool

It’s important to check the liquidity pool compared to the market cap! If the market cap is high but there’s basically no liquidity it should always raise a red flag! A good ratio for this is that the liquidity pool is at least around 10% of the market cap! 

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3. Check if The token is Doxxed / Audited!

Tokens are nowadays often audited by third parties. There are already some fraudulent audits going on, you cannot solely trust this but good to keep in mind while searching for the next x1000 rocket. 

4. Don’t invest without checking yourself!

If it’s too good to be true, it most probably is not. Do your own research and at least check the things mentioned in this article, never go with recommendations purely – If you’re not a gambler. In altcoinreviews.org you can find reviews of tokens where for example the things mentioned in this article are summarized by coin. 

5. Check the community!

It takes only a couple of minutes to join the tokens telegram channel. Don’t neglect this step, there are lots of huge Telegram groups full of bots, but bots rarely write. Follow the groups for a day or so to see how active the community is and there are lots of fraudulent comments!

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Crypto Scam

2020 Twitter hack scammer faces trial for another crypto theft case worth $784,000

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  • 2020 Twitter Hack scammer faces trial for another cyber theft.
  • Scammer in sim-swap attack dupes victim of around $784,000 in 2019.
  • He is facing trial fpr an act commited before 2020 Twitter hack.

Joseph James O’Connor, 22, an accomplice in the famous 2020 Twitter Hack that saw the account of many celebrities, politicians and tech giants compromised for a crypto giveaway scam, is facing trial for another crypto theft case.

O’Connor, also known as PlugwalkJoe, was charged on Wednesday over a separate scheme resulting in the theft of $784,000 of cryptocurrency.

US prosecutors in Manhattan said Joseph James O’Connor, 22, and his accomplices stole bitcoin, Ethereum, and Litecoin after gaining control of victims’ cellphone numbers by linking them to subscriber identity module cards, or SIM cards.

He allegedly attacked three executives of a Manhattan cryptocurrency company, stole cryptocurrency from two clients, and laundered what they stole in the sim-swapping scam.

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However, the scam he is being charged for was perpetrated between Marc and May 2018, before the 2020 Twitter hack.

Notably, if O’Connor and his gang are convicted, they could spend up to 20-year jail terms or more.

O’Connor in the Twitter hack

Before his current trial, O’Connor was arrested in July for his role in the 2020 Twitter hack.

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Accounts of personalities like Barack Obama, Joe Biden, Elon Musk, Jeff Bezos, and Bill Gates were compromised for a crypto giveaway scam.

The incident also affected accounts belonging to major crypto entities, including Binance, Bitfinex, Coinbase, Changpeng Zhao, and Justin Sun.

He and the crew that ran that scam amassed over $118,000 in Bitcoin from unsuspecting victims by tweeting about fake giveaways.

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O’Connor is in detention in Spain while US authorities push for his extradition. His partner in the Twitter hack, a teenager and mastermind of the hack, Graham Ivan Clark, pleaded guilty back in March in a Florida court and will serve a three-year jail term in a juvenile prison based on his agreement with authorities.

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Crypto Scam

Elon Musk-Impersonating Scammers Receive $62,654 in Bitcoin from Another Unaware Victim

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Popular cryptocurrency tracker shows that someone has sent over one Bitcoin to a confirmed Elon Musk crypto giveaway scam

Whale Alert crypto tracking service has tweeted that a transaction worth 1.03 Bitcoin ($62,654) has been detected, carrying crypto to scammers who are impersonating Tesla CEO and crypto supporter Elon Musk.

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Naïve users keep sending their crypto to scammers

The Bitcoin was sent to a giveaway scam. This type of fraud occurs when scammers pretend to be a famous person, put up videos as YouTube advertisements and ask users to send them crypto, promising to send back a double amount of it.

Among the famous crypto personalities whose names scammers like to use are the Tesla CEO and the world’s richest man, Elon Musk, co-founder and frontman of Ethereum Vitalik Buterin and Cardano founder Charles Hoskinson.

Over a year since Elon Musk’s page and other Twitter A-list accounts were hacked

Perhaps the greatest success achieved by crypto scammers occurred in July 2020. Back then, the Twitter accounts of major celebrities, entrepreneurs and politicians were hijacked and used to advertise a Bitcoin giveaway scam.

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Among the victims of the hack were Elon Musk, Barack Obama, Joe Biden, Kanye West and Kim Kardashian.

More than $118,000 worth of Bitcoin was sent by unaware Twitter users to scammers.

As was discovered later on, the hack and scam was pulled off by a teenager from Florida, Graham Clark. Recently, he was sentenced to three years in prison.

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